"vintage shasta"0926 Water Damaged Ceiling
    • Public Gallery  • Help  
• Join Now!  • Log In  • Feature Tour
 Dan Hellier | Home > 
0926 Water Damaged Ceiling
Ceiling is water damaged.  During the repair I had a customer offer to buy the trailer as is and finish the job himself, so that's what I did.
Date(s): October 11, 2009. Album by Dan Hellier. Photos by Dan. 1 - 73 of 73 Total. 0 Visits.
Start SlideshowTo order prints and photo-products: 1. Select photos. 2. Click Order. 3. Select products.Select images and click to download to your computerSend Email of Selected Photos 
Enlarge photo 1
1
October 11, 2009.  Day one.  Trailer is shored and stabilized to begin repair.

Enlarge photo 2
2
Water damage R/H front corner, as seen looking through to back side of overhead cabinet.

Enlarge photo 3
3
same as last picture

Enlarge photo 4
4
Bathroom ceiling

Enlarge photo 5
5
Bathroom ceiling above shower.

Enlarge photo 6
6

Enlarge photo 7
7
You can't see it here, but there is some soft wood, just adjacent to the air conditioner.

Enlarge photo 8
8
Inside the front cabinet above the kitchen sink.

Enlarge photo 9
9
Forward small cabinet removed, shows buckling in left corner.

Enlarge photo 10
10
Earlier seen r/h damage, no shown with cabinet removed.

Enlarge photo 11
11

Enlarge photo 12
12

Enlarge photo 13
13
October 17, 2009 Starting to remove the ceiling from the bathroom.  The vinyl is still attached to the lowest layer of the plywood above, which is just coming apart in layers.

Enlarge photo 14
14
First look at the bottem layer of the plywood, seperated from the next layer.

Enlarge photo 15
15
Kind of hard to see here, but this wood is actively wet, not just moisture, but sopping wet.

Enlarge photo 16
16
This is above the bathroom ceiling.  This is the upper piece of plywood (top or sandwitch) that the rubber liner glues to and top and the styrofoam glues to on the bottom.  Here you see how the upper piece of plywood is wet and sagging.  It's magnified in the next picture.

Enlarge photo 17
17

Enlarge photo 18
18
Once again, in the picture you can't tell just how wet this wood is.  You can kind of get an idea if you look at the three different shades.  Dry, damp, wet.

Enlarge photo 19
19
Here you can see a little better the water that was literally running down this ply after I removed it.

Enlarge photo 20
20
Here you see an upper layer of the plywood where it is glued to the styrofoam.  Every square inch of this ceiling is glued in. (Sandwich construction)

Enlarge photo 21
21
Here you can see the styrofoam, the middle (meat) part of the sandwich.

Enlarge photo 22
22
Another piece of wood where styrofoam stuck to it while I pried it off.

Enlarge photo 23
23
Here's the big problem.  The roof liner and the entire sandwich is sagging.  This water puddle is at least an inch deep.  This is a real issue.  This is only going to grow and sag more with time until the roof finally colapses.

Enlarge photo 24
24
This angle, is a little harder to see the depth of the water.  However, what you can see, is how concave the roof is becoming, and you can almost predict how it will grow more and more as more water gets trapped in it.

Enlarge photo 25
25

Enlarge photo 26
26

Enlarge photo 27
27
October 21.  Starting to open up the front area where the ceiling is sagging.

Enlarge photo 28
28
So far I see rot all the way back to the door.

Enlarge photo 29
29
Wow, the whole sandwich cracked.  This is where the worst of the sag was.

Enlarge photo 30
30

Enlarge photo 31
31
Here you catch a glimpse of the upper layer of plywood that makes up the top of the sandwich.  It is rotted all the way through as well.

Enlarge photo 32
32
Here you're actually looking at the bottom side of the rubber roof.

Enlarge photo 33
33
More rot of upper sandwich, directly under rubber roof.

Enlarge photo 34
34
Still following the rot back past the door.

Enlarge photo 35
35

Enlarge photo 36
36
I'm using my "dead men" to keep the liner from sagging in the event of rain.

Enlarge photo 37
37

Enlarge photo 38
38

Enlarge photo 39
39
Still more rot to the side of the air conditioner.

Enlarge photo 40
40
Rot inside the kitchen cabinet.

Enlarge photo 41
41
The big picture looking backward.  I still have more rot to remove, the existing opened area over to near the centerline of the trailer.

Enlarge photo 42
42
November 29, 2009.  After a long respite, I'm slowly getting back to this trailer after working many others. Here the initial piece of 1/8 paneling is cut and placed over the two beams and up against the rubber liner.

Enlarge photo 43
43

Enlarge photo 44
44
Here a 1x2 is anchored into the aluminum beam so that the cross beam structure can be tied in.

Enlarge photo 45
45
January 30, 2010  Back in the saddle again.  O.k., after a long break, here we go with the repair.  Here are the oak cross members that will be supporting the roof.

Enlarge photo 46
46

Enlarge photo 47
47

Enlarge photo 48
48

Enlarge photo 49
49

Enlarge photo 50
50

Enlarge photo 51
51

Enlarge photo 52
52

Enlarge photo 53
53

Enlarge photo 54
54
This is a temporary brace for now.  There will be a permanent brace in this location after the new ceiling is put in.

Enlarge photo 55
55
Pictures added 2-14, 2010

Enlarge photo 56
56

Enlarge photo 57
57

Enlarge photo 58
58

Enlarge photo 59
59

Enlarge photo 60
60

Enlarge photo 61
61
Bathroom is on left behind kitchen

Enlarge photo 62
62

Enlarge photo 63
63
That's the bunk on the upper right where the saw is.

Enlarge photo 64
64
Bathtub

Enlarge photo 65
65

Enlarge photo 66
66

Enlarge photo 67
67
Dinette area, folds down into a twin size bed.

Enlarge photo 68
68
couch folds out into a little bigger than twin size.

Enlarge photo 69
69
This whole repair is ready to be closed up.  Just needs 1/8 inch panels cut to size, stapled / glued and painted.

Enlarge photo 70
70

Enlarge photo 71
71
All this area is fine, just needs to also be covered with 1/8 panels and painted.

Enlarge photo 72
72

Enlarge photo 73
73

 
 Select All.  
  Sign the Guestbook. There are no entries.
 
Album Properties. Email Album. Send Invitation. Add to Website. Share URL