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Suffragette
Album by Cathy Gordon. 1 - 120 of 120 Total. 36870 Visits.
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Wonderful history and historical artifacts!!!
 - 
Sue Henger, Sun, 7 Aug 2022 8:49AM
Cathy,

Thanks so much for sharing these amazing images. I would love to know more about where you found the letter from Lucy Carr Shaw to Mrs. Pankhurst about Wallace Dunlop.

Best,
Quinn
 - 
Quinn, Tue, 18 May 2021 9:20AM
The suffragette pins are incredible.  Thank you for saving them.
 - 
Michael Robinson, Mon, 9 Dec 2019 11:21PM
Very nice.
 - 
Gail D Jacobs, Fri, 19 Apr 2019 4:31PM
Interseted in anything that has to do with the suffragette movement.
 - 
Pamela, Fri, 9 Feb 2018 2:23PM
  More guestbook entries...
Start SlideshowSelect images and click to download to your computer 
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Holloway prison eating implement.

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Ring in the Suffragette Colors
British
Circa 1910

A fine gold ring, circa 1910, set with a central faceted amethyst surrounded by demantoid garnets and diamonds, in the symbolic colors of the Suffragette movement - green for hope, white for purity and purple for regal dignity. The quality of this ring suggests it was made for a wealthy supporter of the movement. It is difficult to find any examples of genuine Suffragette suporters' jewelry today and this is the first ring I have seen in the Suffragette colors.


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National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies enamel badge

The NUWSS was founded in 1897 in England when rival suffrage groups decided to join forces under the leadership of Millicent Fawcett, who said the movement was “like a glacier; slow moving but unstoppable.”

That proved to be true and this scarce 7/8 inch enamel pin was part of the movement.


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1904 Morgan silver dollar  pop - out lady's pin, in gold plating, over the repousse altered coin, the image of Lady Liberty bursting through the surface of the coin. Popular among suffragettes.

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Gold and enamel necklace in colors of Suffrage
English
Circa 1910

15 carat gold necklace set with amethysts, pearls and and enameled in white, circa 1910. The necklace is in the colors of the Suffragette movement - green for hope, purple for dignity and white for purity.

The chain is in 20 inches in length with a gold barrel clasp. The pendant drop section measures 1 and 1/8 inches by 3/4 of an inch and the two floral sections each measure 2/3 of an inch by 2/3 of an inch. Marked EK on the clasp


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Gold and enamel necklace in colors of Suffrage
English
Circa 1910


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Gold and enamel necklace in colors of Suffrage
English
Circa 1910


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Gold and enamel necklace in colors of Suffrage
English
Circa 1910


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Gold and enamel necklace in colors of Suffrage
English
Circa 1910


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Suffragette Amethyst and Enamel Pendant
Child and Child
Circa 1910

Fine quality Suffragette pendant from the firm of Child and Child, circa 1910. Child and Child, London art jewelers from 1880 - 1916, were known for their beautiful enamel work and unusual designs.  Their distinctive  jewelry appealed to a wealthy, avant-garde clientele and they were patronized by artists from the Pre-Raphaelite circle including Sir Edward Burne Jones and William Holman Hunt, as well as royalty.

This Suffragette pendant, in the colors of the movement, is high carat gold and silver, set with a large faceted Siberian amethyst and diamonds, and enameled in purple and green. Surmounting the amethyst heart are the initials: R [in diamonds] and and C [ in enamel, both forwards and backwards]. These were the initials of Renee Courtauld [1873 -1962] a Suffragette from the renowned Courtauld silk family.

The pendant is 2 and 1/8 inches in length and 1 and 1/8 inches wide at...


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Suffragette Amethyst and Enamel Pendant
Child and Child
Circa 1910


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Suffragette Amethyst and Enamel Pendant
Child and Child
Circa 1910


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Suffragette Amethyst and Enamel Pendant
Child and Child
Circa 1910

Back of pendant showing the two gold coiled supports to reverse to ensure the pendant sits comfortably on the neck.


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Sunflower mark of Child and Child

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Suffragette Holloway brooch and Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) badge

Owned by Marion Wallace-Dunlop (1864-1942)
Holloway brooch awarded in 1909

Marion Wallace-Dunlop was a supporter of women's suffrage and in 1900 she joined the Central Society for Women's Suffrage. She was also a socialist and from 1906 she was an active member of the Fabian Women's Group.

By 1905 the media had lost interest in the struggle for women's rights. Newspapers rarely reported meetings and usually refused to publish articles and letters written by supporters of women's suffrage. Emily Pankhurst, the leader of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), advocated a new strategy of militancy to obtain the publicity that she thought would be needed in order to obtain the vote.

During the summer of 1908 the WSPU introduced the tactic of breaking the windows of government buildings. On 30th June suffragettes marched into Downing Street and...


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Inscription to Marion Wallace Dunlop and brooch in its original box

A rare Suffragette Holloway brooch, designed by Sylvia Pankhurst and presented to Suffragette hunger strikers who had been incarcerated in Holloway prison for their militant actions in support of the cause.

The silver brooch is in the shape of a portcullis, representing the House of Commons, with a central convict's arrow enameled in the colors of the Suffragette movement - purple for dignity, green for hope and white for purity, and with convict chains to each side.

In July 1908, Wallace-Dunlop was arrested and charged with "obstruction" and was briefly imprisoned.

On 25th June 1909 Wallace-Dunlop was charged "with wilfully damaging the stone work of St. Stephen's Hall, House of Commons, by stamping it with an indelible rubber stamp, doing damage to the value of 10s." According to a report in The Times Wallace-Dunlop printed a notice that read: "Women's Deputation. June 29. Bi...


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Letter written to Mrs. Pankhurst from Lucy Carr Shaw including an extract of a letter from her brother George Bernard Shaw about Marion Wallace Dunlop's hunger strike. Page 1:

Aug 2nd
Dear Mrs. Pankhurst

The following extract from a letter written to me by a man of some literary fame, ought, I think, to reach Miss Wallace Dunlop.

 " I thank you for Votes for Women. This movement is the greatest and most important in the history of the race, Heaven forbid that it should fail .... Miss Wallace Dunlop is the hero, she has struck a chord that will vibrate to the end of time; and when we are dead


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Letter written to Mrs. Pankhurst from Lucy Carr Shaw including an extract of a letter from her brother George Bernard Shaw about Marion Wallace Dunlop's hunger strike. Page 2:

and forgotten, when this great movement has spent itself and been crowned with victory, our spirits poised on a sunset cloud will see her statue standing in Trafalgar Square. She had no battleships nor thousands of half drunken sailors to win doubtful victories, her victory was the triumph of the spirit,


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Letter written to Mrs. Pankhurst from Lucy Carr Shaw including an extract of a letter from her brother George Bernard Shaw about Marion Wallace Dunlop's hunger strike. Page 3:

, the greatest and most difficult of all fights, before which the shamble of the battlefield and warships are but the ferocious struggle of human dogs".

If anyone had written like that about me I think I should have been glad to know it and so I send it on to add to the many tributes that Miss Wallace Dunlop has


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Letter written to Mrs. Pankhurst from Lucy Carr Shaw including an extract of a letter from her brother George Bernard Shaw about Marion Wallace Dunlop's hunger strike. Page 4:

already received. Some day, when it can be done with as little trouble as possible to yourself, may I ask you to sign a very charming photograph I have of you

Yours sincerely,
Lucy Carr Shaw


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Photograph of Marion Wallace Dunlop's sister dated September 1901

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Photograph of Marion Wallace Dunlop's sister (undated)

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Photograph of Marion Wallace Dunlop's sister (undated)

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Watercolor of a child
Marion Wallace Dunlop (1862-1942)
(portrait after conservation)

A leader in the British Suffrage movement and the initiator of the hunger strike when imprisoned in Holloway in June 1909.  She fasted for 91 hours and was then set free.

She was born in Scotland, the daughter of Robert Wallace-Dunlop, CB. She studied at the Slade and in 1903, for the first time, exhibited at the Royal Academy (again in 1905 and 1906).  She also worked as an illustrator, publishing Fairies, Elves and Flower Babies (1899) and The Magic Fruit Garden (1899).

The sitter for this portrait is unknown.


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Watercolor of a child
Marion Wallace Dunlop (1862-1942)
(portrait prior to conservation)

A leader in the British Suffrage movement and the initiator of the hunger strike when imprisoned in Holloway in June 1909.  She fasted for 91 hours and was then set free.

She was born in Scotland, the daughter of Robert Wallace-Dunlop, CB. She studied at the Slade and in 1903, for the first time, exhibited at the Royal Academy (again in 1905 and 1906).  She also worked as an illustrator, publishing Fairies, Elves and Flower Babies (1899) and The Magic Fruit Garden (1899).

The sitter for this portrait is unknown.


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Portion of a label on the back of the portrait

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Pendant in the Suffragette Colors
Circa 1910

A high-carat gold pendant set with an amethyst, rare green demantoid garnets and natural pearls. The colors are those of the Women's Suffragette movement, symbolizing green for hope, white for purity and purple for regal dignity.The pendant measures 4 cm by 3 cm [1 and 2/3 inches by 1 and 1/4 inches] and the chain is 18 inches long. A rare Suffragette piece in immaculate condition in its original case.


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VOTES FOR WOMEN WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION
The Clarion button (10-star large version)
American

1 1/4" pinback with iconic graphics of a women with a large banner trumpeting the call for equality. 10 stars; dark purple surround with outer and inner white rings 1 1/4" and in bright, excellent condition.

This button was the product of the Women’s Political Union, formed by Harriot Stanton Blatch, daughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.  It employs the purple, green, and white colors of Emmeline Pankhurst’s English organization, the Women’s Social and Political Union, and adapts the “Bugler Girl” design created by Caroline Watts for the National Union of Women Suffrage Societies.

The button’s colorful nature and its militant figure reflect the more activist approach to suffrage on the part of the WPU as opposed to that of its more conservative counterpart, the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

This pin comes in two varieties, one with a tw...


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EQUAL SUFFRAGE WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION
The Clarion button (10-star small version)
American

The small 10-star Clarion 3/4" pinback button in excellent condition with Bastian Bros. Co., Rochester NY backpaper. Rare, and a tougher variety than the previous 1 1/4" style


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VOTES FOR WOMEN WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION
The Clarion 6-star
American

VOTES FOR WOMEN WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION (centered below woman's feet) 1 1/4" pinback with iconic graphics of a woman with a large banner trumpeting the call for equality. 6 stars; dark purple surround with outer and inner white rings 1 1/4" Backpaper: Women's Political Union 46 E. 29th St. N.Y. City


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VOTES FOR WOMEN WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION
The Clarion 11-star
American

VOTES FOR WOMEN WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION (on left side) 1 1/4" pinback with iconic graphics of a woman with a large banner trumpeting the call for equality. 11 stars; lavender surround, woman is larger and helmet crosses into the border unlike the other style; 1 1/4" Backpaper: Women's Political Union 13 W. 42nd St. N.Y. City


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VOTES FOR WOMEN WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION
The Clarion 12-star
American

VOTES FOR WOMEN WOMEN'S POLITICAL UNION (on left side) 1 1/4" pinback with iconic graphics of a woman with a large banner trumpeting the call for equality. 12 stars; lavender surround, woman is larger and helmet crosses into the border unlike the other style; 1 1/4" Backpaper: Women's Political Union 13 W. 42nd St. N.Y. City


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National Junior Suffrage Corps -- Youth Today Tomorrow Power
American

A celluloid badge with a green pine tree against yellow background and white outer ring. 15/16th in diameter. Back paper missing.


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Votes for Women badge
American

11/16" enamel on "STERLING" (marked on back) silver pin. Shows Lady Justice, in excellent condition.


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Votes for Women -- Patriotism
American

Colorful 3/4 inch celluloid badge, eagle, draped flags, 12 stars on yellow background with blue trim.


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Votes for Women button
American

7/8" celluloid pinback with 4 stars (Wyoming (1869), Utah (1870, 1895), Colorado (1893), Idaho(1986)). Cream white background, red letters, blue stars and border.


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Votes for Women button
American

Back of button: National Equipment Co., 12 E.23rd St., New York, Tel.247-Gram


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Women's Political Union (WPU) celluloid button.  
American

When Harriot Stanton Blatch, daughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, returned from England in 1902, she joined several groups involved in elevating the status of women, forming her own organization the Equality League of Self Supporting Women in 1907, which became the Women’s Political Union in 1910 and later merged with Alice Paul’s Congressional Union to form the National Woman’s Party.  

The WPU borrowed much from Emmeline Pankhurst’s English group, the Women’s Social and Political Union, including its name and its official colors of purple, green, and white.


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Men's Equal Suffrage League pinback
American

MEN'S EQUAL SUFFRAGE LEAGUE very rare, little 1/2" pinback in excellent condition with Whitehead & Hoag Co. backpaper.

Research has indicated that the "Men's Equal Suffrage was founded by Max Eastman (a prominent New York socialist) in 1910. There are references to groups with the same name in Maine and Virginia. Maybe the only pinback that reflects men's role in the suffrage movement.


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Vote NO on Woman Suffrage badge
American

An anti-suffrage badge, celluloid in red and cream, 7/8" in diameter.


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Anti Suffrage badge
American

Celluloid anti-suffrage badge in cream with red center, 3/4" in diameter.


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Anti Suffrage badge
American

Back paper of badge: The Whitehead & Hoag Co., Buttons, Badges, Novelties, and Signs, Newark, NJ.


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Sold
Political Equality Association Votes for Women mirror
American

This 2 ¼” suffrage mirror was put out by Alva Belmont’s Political Equality Association of New York in her organization’s official colors of blue and white. It is the only known example of a suffrage mirror. The angel herald image also appears on a smaller button version. I know of only 3 copies of this piece in existence. A true rarity that may never return to the market.


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Political Equality Association Votes for Women celluloid pin
American

1 1/4 inch with a a faint scratch at top center, National Equipment Co. back paper.  The six stars on the herald’s flag indicated that this badge was made after California became in 1911 the sixth state to grant full voting rights to for women.  

There is also a celluloid mirror with a white border (cut away on the badge).  

Distributed by Alva Belmont a Newport, R.I. socialite, whose money helped to fund many pro-suffrage causes.  However, what was perceived by some to be an imperious attitude, alienated many in the suffrage movement. It was through her financial assistance that the National American Woman Suffrage Association was able to move its headquarters from Warren, Ohio to New York City.


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Political Equality Association Votes for Women celluloid pin
American

Back paper: National Equipment Co., 12 E, 23rd St, New York, Tel. 2455 18th


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DIRIGO VOTES FOR WOMEN badge
American

7/8" from Maine. "Dirigo" (Latin - "I Lead") is a term that appears on Maine's State Seal This has a cream background with a dark green border.


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DIRIGO VOTES FOR WOMEN badge
American
Back paper: Boston Badge Co., 294 Washington, Boston, Mass.


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Votes for Women 1915
American

Celluloid button: 7/8"; simple pin catch at reverse; rising sun motif in gold against a creamy white ground with "Votes for Women" above the rays of the sun and "1915" at the base of the button (lettering in turquoise); turquoise surround; The Whitehead and Hoag Company backpaper


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Votes for Women 1915
American

Backpaper: The Whitehead and Hoag Company Newark, NJ Buttons, Badges, Novelties and Signs


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Sold
National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA)
American

Around 1896, the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) adopted a new logo, that of a sunflower with the date of the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 printed in the center.  The sunflower design was adapted from the 1867 Kansas campaign where local supporters wore yellow ribbons in commemoration of both suffrage and the state flower.

The date is in metal numerals in a domed cloisonne enamel center of dark reddish brown/burgundy. The center is ruby red, not the yellow of either the sunflower or of what was by now the official color of NAWSA.


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Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage
American

Alice Paul's National Women's Party (NWP) enamel rectangular pin in purple, white and yellow; 1" x 7/8"


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Votes for Women
American

3/8” x 1 ½” enamel bar pin with the slogan "Votes for Women". The purple, yellow, and white colors on this enamel bar indicate that it was issued for Alice Paul’s Congressional Union or, as it was later to become, the National Woman’s Party. A very scarce enamel.


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Votes for Women WSPU
British

The original Chain Link design, originally used by Emmeline Pankhurst’s Women’s Social and Political Union.  The WSPU version comes in three variants with green, purple, and violet alternating as the dominant color on the outside circle of the badge.  

Other organizations borrowed the design as well, including the CWSA Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association, the Men’s Political Union for Women’s Enfranchisement, a militant group founded in 1910 by Victor Duval as the male counterpart in England to the WSPU, and the Just Government League of Maryland.  The CWSA, the MPUWE, and the JGL all borrowed the purple, white, and green of the WSPU to use for their own official colors.


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Votes for Women CWSA
American

Chain Link pin; Votes for Women, CWSA Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association; modeled after the WSPU badge; central motif of linked chains in green with CWSA in lavender, cream surround, green edge; 1 1/4"

backpaper Conn. Woman Suffrage Assn. 133 Hawthorne St. Hartford, Conn. Made by Torsch & Franz Badge Co. Balto, MD.


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Votes For Women Plank badge
American

1 ¼” celluloid button with a donkey in the center on cream with a green circle, then a purple circle on the outside, marked Votes for Women Plank.

Sometimes referred to as the “Donkey Plank” pin, this item was issued by the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association, probably in 1917 for a rally held in New Haven.

It has topped several suffrage wanted lists in the past. Only two examples known in the hobby. Wonderful condition and sharp colors!


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Rona Robinson and her Hunger Strike Medal

This rare English medal was awarded to Rona Robinson, a member of the Women's Social and Political Union.
Shown are two photographs of Rona Robinson (the one on the left dates 13 May 1938). 1909 was a particularly active year for Rona Robinson and her fight for suffrage.  She was twice sentenced, imprisoned, and went on the hunger strike that this medal commemorates applauding her for her valor. As Rona 's history attests she was involved in violent as well as non-violent actions in an effort to call attention to the Suffragette cause, votes for women.

Rona was not only a suffragette but the first ever woman to gain a first class BSc in the Honours School of Chemistry, Victoria University, Manchester. Rona began her career as a teacher and she continued on to a a career in Research Chemistry.

Rona Robinson died in 1962 from bronchitis, a condition she contracted during her time in prison.


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Hunger Strike Medal awarded to Rona Robinson
British

The circular silver medal is hung on a green, white and purple ribbon and  inscribed "HUNGER STRIKE" on the front and "RONA ROBINSON" on the obverse. The bars are inscribed in descending order "FOR VALOUR", "OCTOBER 15th 1909" and "AUGUST 20th 1909. The two bars signify two separate arrests and hunger strikes that Rona endured for her cause.

On the obverse of the top bar is the makers name and address "TOYE 57 THEABOLD RD LONDON"

It is believed that no more than 100 of the medals were awarded; there is no answer to how many have survived.


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Hunger Strike Medal awarded to Rona Robinson
British

Back of the Hunger Strike Medal showing the unfaded colors of the ribbon.  Marked Rona Robinson.


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Possible handmade Suffrage brooch.
British

Enamel on brass.  The period of major Suffrage activity paralleled the Arts and Crafts movement.  During this time, many women handmade jewelry and it is possible this was a Suffrage statement.


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Equal Franchise Society State of nevada badge
American

3/4” celluloid badge in yellow, white and black.  The outside slogan in the yellow band is "Equal Franchise Society State of Nevada" and on the banner in the center is the slogan "Votes for Women on the Way" This pin has always been near the top of want lists for collectors of suffrage for quite some time.

First of all, it is very scarce.
Secondly, the banner in the center identifies this as from Nevada. Suffrage memorabilia from the South West is very, very rare.


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Penna Votes for Women 1915
American

3/4” celluloid badge with a white background, blue keystone and slogan "Penna Votes for Women 1915". Prior to the 1915 campaign in Pa. to get a franchise initiative passed at the ballot box, many women were afraid of attracting too much attention, lest they stir up the opposition too much.

Whatever the case, Pennsylvania suffragists produced far fewer buttons than their counterparts in the other Eastern States holding referenda that year.


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Suffrage pins designed by Rube Goldberg

3 assorted vintage celluloid Woman’s Rights pinback buttons: one 7/8” Women’s Rights!, and two 7/8” Don’t Let It Suffer designed by Rube Goldberg.


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No Vote No Tax badge
British

1 3/8” black, brown and white celluloid badge picturing a ship on stormy waves with the slogan "No Vote - No Tax." This graphic pin from England was designed for the Tax Resistance League by Mary Sargent Florence.  Several English suffrage groups urged women to withhold their taxes until they received the vote.


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Votes for Women New York 1915 badge
American

1 ¼” celluloid badge with a green center with the slogan "New York 1915", then a white ring, then a purple ring with the slogan "Votes for Women." Issued by the WPU, this button has long been a classic in the hobby. It was also issued for the Eastern States Campaign. It is in superb condition.


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WSPU Postcard
British

Marked with the slogan "Fight On Fight Better" and the Latin motto. 'Spes vincit' 'Hope conquers'. In addition, the number -7- and dated 21.2.1909 (the date of Helen's first arrest) and 24.2.1914.  

The label on the upper left is glued to the card and is the design of Sylvia Pankhurst, daughter of WSPU founder, Emmeline Pankhurst.  In the WSPU colors of purple, green and white, a woman is emerging from her prison cell, stepping over broken chains and her banner states "Votes for Women"  

Acquired as part of an auction lot of a rare unique autograph album of 100 pages owner by Helen Kirkpatrick Watts for two separate dinners held in 1912 and 1928, containing 160 signatures of suffragettes with some associated items of ephemera.

Signatories in the album include prominent members of the movement such as Sylvia Pankhurst, Constance Lytton and Marion Wallace-Dunlop, the first hunger striker.  The W...


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VOTE FOR WOMAN SUFFRAGE NOV. 2. 1815 1915 ELIZABETH CADY STANTON CENTENNIAL badge
American

1 1/4" celluloid pin in excellent condition with a Women's Political Union N.Y. City backpaper. Among the best suffrage pins.


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WEST VIRGINIA VOTE FOR WOMAN SUFFRAGE NOVEMBER 1916
American

Scarce "West Virginia" stickpin in excellent condition with Bastian Bros. Co. Rochester, NY backpaper


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WSP VOTES FOR WOMEN badge
American

Rare 1 1/4" celluloid pinback distributed by the Woman Suffrage Party in excellent condition with W.F. Miller Manufacturer New York backpaper.


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LET OHIO WOMEN VOTE badge
American

Scarce 7/8" pinback in near mint condition with Whitehead & Hoag Co. backpaper.

According to Ken Florey (in his terrific book "Women's Suffrage Memorabilia:"

Ohio was one of 6 states which scheduled a Suffrage referendum in 1912.  While it ultimately failed, there were innovative please including an attempt to personalize the issue for men ("the vote was for the women in their lives").  

This pin is a drawing of an allegorical woman holding arrows in one hand and a sheaf of wheat in the other along with the plea "Let Ohio Women Vote."  This particular design emerged as the standard iconic Image for the campaign and appeared on postcards, stationary, posters and Cinderella stamps.


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Let Mother Vote (Ohio)
American

Very scarce ¾”  celluloid.  Also used in the Ohio campaign, this is the only suffrage pin to Ken Florey's knowledge that used the theme of giving mother the vote, a popular campaign issue.


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Belva A. Lockwood Campaign Card
American

Yours, For Equal Civil and Political Rights, Belva A. Lockwood campaign card, dated 1884. 3 x 5", blank back, in excellent condition. This card came directly from the Belva Lockwood presidential campaign headquarters at her home. The political inscription makes this an exceptionally rare and desirable card. See Florey pg 28-29


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WSPU tea cup and saucer
British

WSPU tea cup and saucer each featuring the symbol of the Women's Social and Political Union, designed by Sylvia Pankhurst, the daughter of Emmeline Pankhurst. The saucer is 5" diameter and the cup stands about 2 5/8" tall. These were sold at a 1909 Suffrage Exhibition in England. Both are in excellent condition, and quite rare. See Florey pg 69-70


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"36" badge
American

Pinback button promoting woman suffrage, circa 1920.  5/8" cello in excellent condition.  

Issued in anticipation of the ratification of the 19th amendment, giving women the right to vote.  "36" refers to the number of states needed to ratify the equal suffrage amendment - Tennessee would become that state on August 24, 1920


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National Woman Suffrage Congressional Union

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National Union Of Women's Suffrage Societies Constitutional Non-Party Enamel stickpin
British

Multi-colored hallmarked enamel stickpin in the official NUWSS colors of red, white and green. This fantastic and rare item is slightly larger than 7/8" and in perfect shape.

At their height, the NUWSS was organised with more that 400 branches throughout Britain over a 100,000 members that campaigned for women’s equal voting and political rights. It was formed from an amalgamation of various suffrage groups in 1897 but their origins go back further to the formation of the Kensington Society in 1866.

The term Suffragist referred to members of the NUWSS and was not to be confused with the Suffragettes.  The Suffragettes were formed 1903 when Emmeline Pankhurst broke away from the NUWSS to form her own dissident group, the Women’s Social & Political Union or the USPU ( www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Wwspu.htm ). Although both organisations sought the same aims and...


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NUWSS Women's Suffrage Rose badge
British

National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) circular, enameled in green around the edge. Inside that ‘Woman’s Suffrage’ appears in a circle of white enamel and inside that a red rose, with green leaves in the intersections between its petals.   The maker is W.O. Lewis of  Howard Street, Birmingham. Size is 1 1/4"


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Votes for Women
American

7/8" celluloid button white with 6 gold stars.  Backpaper: Lucke Badge & Button Co. Baltimore Maryland


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Votes for Women WFL
English

The Women’s Freedom League was a non-violent suffrage group that was founded in the United Kingdom in 1907.

This scarce celluloid Votes for Women pin is from the WFL’s heyday leading up to women winning the right to vote in England. It’s a 1 3/8 inch celluloid with Merchants’ Portrait Co. back paper, excellent.


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Votes For Women - purple, green, white Classic 1 1/4" Cell Button. One of the classic and popular buttons for suffrage collectors and scarce. This example is excellent.

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Back of Votes For Women button

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Silent Sentinel pin.

Women who participated in suffrage picketing received "Silent Sentinel" pins to honor their service. The small silver banners are engraved, "Without Extinction is Liberty." The reverse is engraved, "For service in the cause of the freedom of women Presented by the National Woman’s Party."

In January 1917, discouraged by President Wilson’s continued opposition to the suffrage amendment, Alice Paul, the leader of the National Woman’s Party (NWP) posted pickets at the White House gates—the first people to ever picket the White House. These “silent sentinels” stayed on duty in all weather and in the face of threats, taunts, and physical violence. Using their banners and their quiet courage they asked, "Mr. President How Long Must Women Wait for their Liberty?" and "Mr. President What Will you do for Woman Suffrage?" Hoping to provoke a response, the language on the banners became more inflammatory. They used the president’s own words against him ...


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Votes for Women Bird
American

3” x 11” die-cut tin bird put out by the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association and bearing the names of Gertrude H. Leonard and Teresa Crowley. Printed in blue, black and dark yellow colors, it urged, "Votes for Women Nov 2."  In pristine condition; see pg 188 Florey


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National Federation of Business and Women's Professional Clubs 1919

Large enamel sign (30" in diameter).  This would have been posted at a woman-owned business.


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Sarah G. Bagley Commemorative Thread Holder

The thread holder celebrates Sarah G. Bagley, found of the Lowell (Massachusetts) Female Labor Reform Movement. Born in 1806 in Candia, New Hampshire, she came to Lowell in 1837 to work as a weaver at the Hamilton Manufacturing Company. In 1840, she contributed a piece entitled “The Pleasures of Factory Work” to the Lowell Offering, the sentiments of which were incompatible with the ideas of the editor, Harriet Farley, who did not think it fitting that the female employees criticize the male owners of the factories. Bagley, however, quickly became disenchanted with the poor working conditions and low wages that women were subject to, and in December 1844, she founded and became the first president of the Lowell Female Labor Reform Association. One of the first acts of this group was to initiate a petition to limit the working day to a maximum of ten hours. She continued to work for reform, but in 1846, she became the first woman telegr...


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Sarah G. Bagley Commemorative Thread Holder made of tin with celluloid end caps

The thread holder carrying her name is a hollow tin cylinder. Each side has a screw off celluloid button holder designed to keep spools of thread inside. The cylinder itself has three holes which allow thread to be pulled through. The piece was used as a fundraiser and sold for 10 cents each when empty and 25 cents when filled with thread.

The Thread Holder Company, self-designated at the "Official Headquarters for Sarah's Suffrage Victory Campaign," offered $500 to each of the top 17 participants in the campaign in terms of sales. All money received from those sales was divided equally between the State League Headquarters in Boston and the Local League Headquarters. A popular and highly sought after suffrage item.


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Women's Freedom League
1909
Suffrage: United Kingdom

WOMEN'S FREEDOM LEAGUE 'RIGHT TO PETITION' BADGE  'It is the Right of the Subjects to Petition the King and all Commitments and Proscutions for such Petitioning are Illegal' - is the legend set inside a round badge which has 'Women's Freedom League 1909' around the outside. The badge is coloured green, white, and gold. The badge is associated with the WFL's picketing of Parliament in 1909 - and comes from the collection of Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson, some or all of whom took part in the picketing. The badge still carries on its reverse the maker's paper 'Merchants Portrait Co.' in pristine condition. An extremely scarce badge.


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Women's Freedom League
1909
Suffrage: United Kingdom

WOMEN'S FREEDOM LEAGUE 'RIGHT TO PETITION' BADGE  

The badge still carries on its reverse the maker's paper 'Merchants Portrait Co.' in pristine condition.


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No Vote -- No Census
United Kingdom

2 versions of the same badge. NO VOTE - NO CENSUS - CENSUS RESISTED BADGE Metal badge worn by suffragettes who boycotted the April 1911 census. Around the outside of the badge is 'No Vote - No Census - Census Resisted and in the center 'A census for Gt Britain shall be taken in the year 1911 & the census day shall be Sunday the 2nd day of April in that year'.


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No Vote -- No Census
United Kingdom

The badges still carry on their reverse the maker's paper 'Merchants Portrait Co.'


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Missouri Ballot Measure Slogan Button.
United States

5/8" button with the State Seal of Missouri, inscribed "Votes For Women".


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Missouri Ballot Measure Slogan Button.
United States


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Clara Giveen Hunger Strike Medal and box (front)

The medal, in its original box, was awarded to Clara Giveen. It is engraved 'Hunger Strike' to the obverse and 'Clara Giveen' to the reverse, mounted on its original green, white and purple ribbon, with enamelled bar and three engraved bars  :'For Valour', 'July 3rd 1913' and 'Nov. 24th 1913'. The two dated bars represent two separate arrests and two hunger strikes. The reverse of the enamelled bar is engraved, 'Fed by Force 1/3/12'. The box is inscribed : Presented to Clara Giveen by the Women's Social and Political union in recognition of a gallant action whereby through endurance to the last extremity of hunger and hardship, a great principle of political justice was vindicated. It is estimated that only 100 of these medals were made and awarded to suffragettes.


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Clara Giveen Hunger Strike Medal and box (back)

The medal, in its original box, was awarded to Clara Giveen. It is engraved 'Hunger Strike' to the obverse and 'Clara Giveen' to the reverse, mounted on its original green, white and purple ribbon, with enamelled bar and three engraved bars  :'For Valour', 'July 3rd 1913' and 'Nov. 24th 1913'. The two dated bars represent two separate arrests and two hunger strikes. The reverse of the enamelled bar is engraved, 'Fed by Force 1/3/12'. The box is inscribed : Presented to Clara Giveen by the Women's Social and Political union in recognition of a gallant action whereby through endurance to the last extremity of hunger and hardship, a great principle of political justice was vindicated. It is estimated that only 100 of these medals were made and awarded to suffragettes.


Clara Giveen [born 1887], joined the Women’s Social and Political Union in response to the treatment ...


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Clara Giveen Toffee Hammer

A miniature toffee hammer brooch engraved 'March 1912'. Toffee hammers were used to break up sheets of toffee candy for future sale and consumption.These small hammers, easily available and easily concealed, were used in the suffragettes’ window-smashing campaign. Wanting to show political displeasure without loss of life, while also making the political statement that the government cared more about a pane of glass than women, window smashing became official WSPU policy in 1911. Over 200 women were arrested during 1911 and 1912 following attacks on commercial and government buildings.


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Helen Kirkpatrick Watts
Suffragette album

A unique autograph album of 100 pages owned by Helen K(irkpatrick) Watts, a militant suffragette who was imprisoned twice in 1909. The album contains over 160 signatures of suffragettes with some associated items of ephemera.  Signatories include prominent members of the movement such as Sylvia Pankhurst, Constance Lytton and Marion Wallace-Dunlop, the first hunger striker.  The Welcome Supper of 1912 and the Ex-Prisoners Dinner of 1928 are commemorated with the signatures of those present and, for the former event the time spent in prison by each woman.


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Page dated April 6, 1908 with Helen Watts signature and address

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Page with illustration and quote signed by Mrs. P(ethick) Lawrence, July 18, 1908

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Page dated 23/6/09 with E. Pankhurst signature.

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Page dated 7/10/09 with D. (Dorothy) Pethick quote and signature.

Dorothy Pethick, born in Somerset, was the younger sister of Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence.

Dorothy was arrested during the WSPU deputation to the House of Commons on 29 June 1909. In October of that year, she and actress Kitty Marion were in Newcastle for the visit of David Lloyd George, and were arrested for breaking the windows of Newcastle General Post Office. Her stone failed to do any damage, so she pleaded “not guilty of smashing, but guilty of trying to” and was sentenced to fourteen days. During this time, she went on a hunger strike, and upon release she wrote in Votes for Women about the lack of hygiene carried out by the prison authorities during the process.

See bio at https://suffragettestories.omeka.net/bio-dorothy-pethick


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H M Prison Leicester
Sept 4-8 1909 Hunger Strike

Signatures of women strikers.


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Deputation Dinner
Fifth Anniversary
February 24 1914

Signatures of attendees.


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Deputation Reunion
Night Anniversary
February 26 1918

Signatures of attendees


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Flyers for an Equal Political Rights Demonstration held in Hyde Park on July 3, 1926.

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Ex-Prisoners Victory Dinner
13th October, 1928

Signatures of attendees.


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Ex-Prisoners Victory Dinner
13th October, 1928

Signatures of attendees. page 2


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Quote and signature Marion Wallace- Dunlop

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2-page letter written about time spent in Holloway.

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2nd page of the letter, possibly written by Amy Hicks.

Annotation "Miss Hicks" most likely refers to Amy Maud Hicks Bull. Amy's mother was Lillian Hicks and both were arrested on Black Friday on 18 November 1910.

In 1912, Amy Hicks was part of a WSPU demonstration that smashed West End shop windows. She was sentenced in March 1912 and jailed for 4 months during which time she went on hunger strike and was force fed.


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