• Public Gallery  • Help  
• Join Now!  • Log In  • Feature Tour
 Cathy Gordon | Home > 
Native American
A variety of Native American jewelry
Album by Cathy Gordon. 1 - 56 of 56 Total. 17551 Visits.
  Sign the Guestbook. There are no entries.
Start SlideshowSelect images and click to download to your computer 
Enlarge photo 1
1
Hand-drilled Pueblo bead jaclas
Circa 1930s

Pure turquoise beads with a wonderful age variation in color and hand drilled (note the "v" shape).  Coral beads at the clasp and white oyster shell beads.  

The beads are irregular and they are push drilled -- the craftsman drills all the way through and then widens the hole on the opposite side, with enough room to get string through.

This necklace looks like it is cotton threaded or linen which is correct, the beads have aged in color naturally, and the
"horns" (the things between the bead and the clasp) look home made as does the clasp from wire. The coral looks real and is traditional and the oyster
shells in the middle are the correct color.

A friend who is familiar with this type of work told me: "So you could say the beads are PUEBLO made rather than Navajo as Navajo's
traditionally do the set silver/turquoise work. But you never know as there is more intermarriage and inter-work...


Enlarge photo 2
2
North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment From Prehistory to Present.
Lois Sherr Dubin, Harry N. Abrams, copyright 1999.

Page 480


Enlarge photo 3
3
North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment From Prehistory to Present.
Lois Sherr Dubin, Harry N. Abrams, copyright 1999.

Page 483


Enlarge photo 4
4
North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment From Prehistory to Present.
Lois Sherr Dubin, Harry N. Abrams, copyright 1999.

Page 484


Enlarge photo 5
5
North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment From Prehistory to Present.
Lois Sherr Dubin, Harry N. Abrams, copyright 1999.

Page 485


Enlarge photo 6
6
North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment From Prehistory to Present.
Lois Sherr Dubin, Harry N. Abrams, copyright 1999.

Page 486


Enlarge photo 7
7
North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment From Prehistory to Present.
Lois Sherr Dubin, Harry N. Abrams, copyright 1999.

Page 487


Enlarge photo 8
8
Native American 900 coin silver cuff bracelet.  Perhaps Fred Harvey style, perhaps earlier (as shown in plate 1000 from North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment From Prehistory to Present, page 486).  Signed with an arrow head.  Deeply punched and stamped with thunderbirds, arrows, faces.

Enlarge photo 9
9
Side view of bracelet.

Enlarge photo 10
10
Back view of the bracelet.

Enlarge photo 11
11
Native American sterling and turquoise bracelet. Fred Harvey style with handmade, applied flowers and lovely aged turquoise.

Enlarge photo 12
12

Enlarge photo 13
13

Enlarge photo 14
14
Zuni 5 Row Turquoise Petit-Point Cuff

Front view.  I think this is an older bracelet, based on its construction.


Enlarge photo 15
15
Zuni 5 Row Turquoise Petit-Point Cuff

Green turquoise


Enlarge photo 16
16
Side view

Enlarge photo 17
17
Inside view

Enlarge photo 18
18
Front view -- note the turquoise stones have changed color.

Enlarge photo 19
19
Zuni 5 Row Turquoise Petit-Point Cuff

Mixture of blue and green turquoise.


Enlarge photo 20
20

Enlarge photo 21
21

Enlarge photo 22
22
Zuni 3 row petit point turquoise sterling bracelet

Enlarge photo 23
23

Enlarge photo 24
24

Enlarge photo 25
25

Enlarge photo 26
26
Zuni cabochon turquoise cuff

This appears to be cast silver.  The turquoise stones are much more green colored -- see the next picture.


Enlarge photo 27
27
Side view.  This is the true color of the turquoise.

Enlarge photo 28
28
Inside view

Possible pawn shop marks etched on the center.


Enlarge photo 29
29
Fred Harvey style brooch with green turquoise.

Enlarge photo 30
30
Back of the brooch.

Enlarge photo 31
31
Fred Harvey style cuff bracelet with green turquoise stone

Enlarge photo 32
32
Side view

Enlarge photo 33
33
Inside view

Enlarge photo 34
34
Native American cuff bracelet with onyx face and Fred Harvey style stampings.

Enlarge photo 35
35
Side view

Enlarge photo 36
36
Inside view

Enlarge photo 37
37
Navajo heavy cuff with fabulous turquois.

This is pawn silver, marked inside.


Enlarge photo 38
38
Side view

Enlarge photo 39
39
Inside view. Pawn shop markings are scratched on the center part of the bracelet.

Enlarge photo 40
40
Navajo turquoise necklace
Circa 1970s?


Enlarge photo 41
41
Back of necklace

Enlarge photo 42
42
Huge turquoise stone in this Navajo cuff bracelet -- more than 3 inches long.  I assume it is more contemporary (maybe 1970s?).

Enlarge photo 43
43
Zuni petit-point cuff bracelet
Contemporary?


Enlarge photo 44
44
Side view

Enlarge photo 45
45
Contemporary Inlaid Sugilite and Sterling Necklace and Cuff
Navajo -- Toney Mitchell

Lovely sterling necklace and bracelet inlaid with two colors of sugilite.

In 1979, a new gem material with a striking purple color was found in the Wessels mine in the northern part of Cape Province, Republic of South Africa.

Examination of jewelry quality sugilite shows that it consists of manganese bearing sugilite in a poly-crystalline aggregate.  The purple color is due to the presence of about 1-3 wt. % manganese oxide.


Enlarge photo 46
46
Another picture of the set.  The colors are a deep purple and lavender.

Enlarge photo 47
47
Sterling and turquoise squash blossom necklace
Navajo
J.M. Begay


Enlarge photo 48
48

Enlarge photo 49
49
Lander Blue Turquoise ring
Alice Platero - Navajo
Circa 1970s?

14K gold ring set with 10 ct Lander Blue turquoise stone.  Made by Alice Platero, marked AP and 14K. Occlusion in the stone at approximately 10:00.


Enlarge photo 50
50
LANDER BLUE MINE

The Lander Blue turquoise mine in Lander County, Nevada is located between Battle Mountain and Tenabo. Found in 1973 it produced some of the most beautiful spider-webbed turquoise ever discovered. Today it is considered the most valuable turquoise known. Not surprisingly as early as 1975 it had been stated that Lander Blue “has become some of the most valued turquoise today.”

Like a number of the other high-grade strikes, Lander Blue was a very rich pocket discovery, and has been referred to as a “hat mine,” a term used to described small floats of turquoise because they could be “covered with a hat.” There were no extensive zones or long veins. These pockets are not uncommon in nature and once mined out they are gone forever.

Lander Blue is almost entirely spider-webbed turquoise with colors from medium to deep blue and a black contrasting matrix. Although some other grades were found only approximately 100 pounds of the beautiful spider-web turq...


Enlarge photo 51
51
LANDER BLUE MINE (con't.)

Like all classic turquoise this one comes with a classic story. RitaHapgood, a one time blackjack dealer in Battle Mountain, while walking with her two sisters found little nuggets on the ground along Indian Creek in the Crescent Valley area of Nevada. After discovering this deposit of high-grade turquoise she went on to claim the site as the Mary Louise Lode Mining Claim, the name Mary Louise belonging to her mother. The mine bordered the Lander Ranch. Later the claim was sold to Marvin Syme and Henry 'Hank' Dorian for the sum of $10,000.00. They brought in Bob Johnson, who provided equipment and began working the claim.  The three then named the company the Lander Blue Turquoise Corporation.

Marvin Syme ended up owning a number of turquoise mines in Nevada and later retired to Idaho. Hank Dorian operated the Nevada Club in Battle Mountain for a number of years until his passing and Bob and Dixie Johnson continued to sell Lander...


Enlarge photo 52
52

Enlarge photo 53
53

Enlarge photo 54
54
Native American Naja necklace
circa 1800s?

Coins on necklace are United States half dimes and date between 1842 and 1856. All strung on fine wire.


Enlarge photo 55
55
Back of Naja. Hand-engraved on back of turquoise stone: 3-71 KNEISEL

Enlarge photo 56
56
Hand made clasp on Native American necklace

 
 Select All.  
 
Album Properties. Email Album. Send Invitation. Add to Website. Share URL