"vintage shasta"Steve S. Water Damage Job 0932
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Steve S. Water Damage Job 0932
Various areas of water damage.
Date(s): December 06, 2009. Album by Dan Hellier. Photos by Dan. 1 - 61 of 61 Total. 1074 Visits.
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This is the rear wall of the refrigerator cabinet.

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First step was to remove the fridge.

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Outside access to fridge.

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This is the inside view of the rear wall of the refrigerator cabinet.

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This is the inside view of the forward wall of the refrigerator cabinet.

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Here is a view of underneath the bathroom vanity which is just aft of the refrigerator cabinet.  Here you can see where water was laying and literally discolored the linoleum.

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This is the underside of the vanity top.  The green stuff is mold that has been growing here because of all the dampness.

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Other view of the mold.

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A good indicator of how deep the water was laying at one point.

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Here the bottom section of skin is removed to show the beams underneath the vanity area.

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This would appear to be the culprit.  I actually saw no signs of water damage in the upper portions of the refrigerator cabinet.  Here however, I can follow the path of where the water had been going.

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Removing the second section of skin.

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Cutting wall inside back of vanity to reach the damaged floor.

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Thankfully, a little bit of good news.  The water damage stopped here and did not extend back underneath the bath tub, which is just the other side of the wall.

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Hard to see in this picture, but the linoleum is removed.  The rotten wood came out like scooping out dirt.  It was pretty bad.

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Cannot see it, but the rear beam is completely gone all the way up.  When I removed the corner to facilitate removing the skin sections, I had quite a suprise.

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Here you can see chunks of the rear beam falling out.

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This picture doesn't show much unfortunately, but the rot continues all the way up here near the clearance light at the top rear corner of the trailer.

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This is at the very bottom corner.

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A little wider view

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The tail light assy, and the backing board for the light assy, have been removed to gain access to the rotted cross members.

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My loose plastic wrap.  There are fans in all sections to dry out what's left after all the rotted wood was removed.

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Here the rotted section of the cross members has been cut out.  There will be splices mad here after everything is well dried out and primered.

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December 12, all the rotted wood is dried, routed out as necessary and KILZ primer put on.

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Here is the start of the repair.  The base beam is tied together with angle iron through which I have put quite a few 3 inch screws to tie everything together.

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All new back corner.  Rather than a 2x2, I always use 2 each 1x2 stapled together.  It's a lot stronger weight bearing wise, and I use only very straight pieces of yellow pine, sometimes poplar or oak, depending on the weight.  Here also, you can see the wedge between the upper and lower beam.  This gives room for expansion and contraction of the corner.

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Onc again, it's impossible to see, but the new beam goes all the way up to and ties in at the top corner.

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All the damaged wood has been removed and what's left has been treated to prevent any further growth.

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More passivation of rot.  Just a little bit on these boards, not enough to constitute removing them.

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More passivation.

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December 13, starting the repair under the vanity.

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Well somehow the pictures I took of the plywood floor and the new wall behind here got deleted. You can see a little bit of the new wall in this picture and in the next 2 pictures.

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This is the area underneath the refrigerator cabinet.  Here I've used 1x2's around the perimeter to hold the walls straight where they were buckled.

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December 24th.  Finally a day that I have off that's above 50 and not raining.  Time to get this thing closed up.

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Bringing everything together at once in the back corner.

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Putting the fridge door access panel back in.  You can see the amount of double sided sticky tape I used around the perhiphery and underneath.

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Rear Corner all sealed and attached at top.  The viynl trim still needs to go in the track.  I do not have that color yet.

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Double sided sticky tape on both sides of the seam before channel is put on.

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Here you can see the bottom half of the channel attached.  With brand new wood everywhere in side the corner, making all the screws fit securely was easy.

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December 26, 2009  Getting ready to put the interior back in.

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Gas line re-installed, lp pressure check tested good.

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Re-framing the cabinet door.

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The stain is currently darker than the surrounding wood, but it will lighten with time.

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Found more mold, this time hiding underneath the kitchen table.  This is positive proof of just how bad the trailer had been sweating in the past that mold just formed anywhere and everywhere.

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Project Complete.

 
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Hi Dan, that looks like a good job there, I really like the idea of putting two 1x2 together to make a stronger 2x2, do you glue them as well as staple them? or do the staples work well enough. I just picked up a pneumatic brad/stapler some of it based on what I have seen here on your site, sure makes stuff easier.
Keep up the good work, I like reading the progress reports.
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Mark Browning | www.browningmotorsports.com, Mon, 21 Dec 2009 3:06PM
 
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