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 Rollie Peschon | Home > 
1800s home
Here are some pictures of two homes built on the prairie in South Dakota, probably late 1800s, or very early 1900s  

They  are half a mile apart, and were probably built by the same home builder, who was a master craftsman in my opinion.  Some of the details are very forward thinking and quite ornate.

WHEN WE BUILD, LET US THINK THAT
WE BUILD FOREVER. LET IT NOT BE
FOR PRESENT USE ALONE. LET IT BE SUCH WORK AS
OUR DECENDENTS WILL THANK US FOR. AND
LET US THINK,AS WE LAY STONE ON STONE,
THAT A TIME IS TO COME WHEN THOSE STONES
WILL BE HELD SACRED BECAUSE OUR HANDS
HAVE TOUCHED THEM, AND THAT PEOPLE WILL
SAY, AS THEY LOOK UPON THE LABOR AND
WROUGHT SUBSTANCE OF THEM, "SEE! THIS OUR
PARENTS DID FOR US"


                       JOHN RUSKIN


Thank you, whoever you are.
Date(s): November 20, 2006. Album by Rollie Peschon. 1 - 16 of 16 Total. 2859 Visits.
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House #1

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Front porch post detail.

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sunburst gable end

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Hand railing at upper level

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Building paper behind siding

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Valance fascia on porch

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exterior wall assembly

1/2" lap siding
solid spaced sheathing
stud cavity.
Solid sheathing
lath and plaster on inside finish


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House #2

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Decorative fascia at porch, with beadboard gable

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Note the top 4 courses of siding at each side of the door.

The builder notched an angular notch every 4 inches in the bottom of the siding, and grooved a vertical line up from the V to make it look like shingles.

Very interesting application/detail


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More building paper.  manufactured in Sioux City Iowa.

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Another interesting siding application, where he scroll sawed the tear drops, and grooved the vertical lines to look like round bottom shingles

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Roof to wall flashing, where the porch roof was originally attached to the ledger board.  I assume the porch had been removed, and the flashing nailed down.  The red piece of metal was part of a kickout flashing from the other roof.

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Wiring in this house, was/is more current than the wiring in my 1928 home, (knob and tube) which tells me that this home was built, prior to electricity coming to the prairie and was retrofitted with power sometime in the 40s, when  that type of wiring became available.

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Heya Jillie!

Thanks.  I love these two old homes, and am trying to get into the county system out there, to see if there are others around the area that were built by this craftsman. Maybe, there will be one that is still being lived in.

One can only hope, that someday, someone will be able to take  a picture of one of the many homes I've been involved with (thanks to your father) and the craftsmanship will cause them to think about the person that built the home.

Thanks for checkin in.
 - 
Rollie, Thu, 1 Feb 2007 6:53PM
I love the charm and hidden stories behind an old house.  It is nice to see you point out the craftmanship from where other's would have a hard time seeing value.  Finding your web site was a nice surprise.  Hello to your family from your Indiana cousins!
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Jill Margetts, Thu, 1 Feb 2007 5:54PM
 
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