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 Cathy Gordon | Home > 
Haskell Fakes
There are a lot of fake Haskells being sold, particularly on eBay.  I had the opportunity to appraise these two necklaces for a buyer.  I am posting pictures of the fakes next to real pieces so you can study the differences and use this for reference.

If anyone has additional examples, I would be happy to include them, so that buyers can educate themselves.
Date(s): March 19, 2004. Album by Cathy Gordon. 1 - 25 of 25 Total. 867 Visits.
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I love your examples of the fake opposed to the real, it helped me out tremendously with a couple of pieces I have that are Miriam Haskell, out of the three, 2 are genuine. I was concerned with the third because it to had some wiring like that, and I wondered if that was supposed to be like that, thank you so much for creating a website like this, I am an eBay Vintage Jewelry seller and I don't want to sell a fake Vintage Jewelry Piece to someone, that's why I am constantly researching every piece I get before I sell. It's great to have a place to refer to when I need to! Thank you for your help!!
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Rhonda Nickerson | http://stores.ebay.com/uniquetreasuresbyrn, Sat, 15 Aug 2015 6:26PM
Look for Katieboops store on ebay. This lady lists every bracelet she makes as having vintage miriam haskell chain! REALLY? There is no Hallmark or signature on her chain. She relists the bracelet after it sells and re-creates an identical one (Hence her feedbackOn Ebay and Etsy), and claims the chain is not only Haskell, but Yes, Miriam Haskell. Miriam made original pieces, no two alike, intricate, valuable. Yet Katieboops sells her pieces on Mirams Original chain. HER STORE SCREAMS COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT On Miriam Haskell.
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Shandra, Thu, 14 May 2015 9:22PM
I have just sold a piece of jewelery that I thought was Haskell on Ebay.  The person that bought it said it was a fake....is there anywhere I can send my pics to have someone look at it and tell me if it is a fake or not....cathy
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Cathy Gregory, Mon, 22 Nov 2010 11:46AM
Hello Cathy, I am an antique/vintage jewelry dealer and one of your biggest fans (I actually contacted you a few years ago re some Fahrner pieces). I recently purchased a massive vintage glass(?) panel runway necklace - probably a one of a kind piece as I have never seen anything like it on the web (I troll quite a bit on ebay and vintage/antique jewelry web sites) or in books (and I have many, many books - yours being one of my favorites of course). I am hoping you will take a look at some pictures and see if you have any ideas (I thought maybe it was a Robert Gossens for some Couturier, but the space age like design and materials may not be right. Please let  me know if you can help me (and I will email you pictures) or have any suggestions. Best, Linda Arkules Cohn
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Linda Arkules Cohn, Sun, 7 Feb 2010 9:13PM
I recently bought a Haskell necklace that I am not sure is real. How can I tell?
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Pat Rahn, Sat, 4 Apr 2009 12:36PM
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Auction description:  "Authentic Signed Miriam Haskell Necklace, 3 strands of Various shapes of Gilt Filigree capped Baroque Pearls, Seed Pearls, Pearl spacers – Bib with a Gorgeous Floral Pendant - 3.5”L Pendant has Seed Pearls, Pearls, Rhinestones, Gilt Leaves, Pearls, Diamond Rondells, 22”L, 1960s, Total Mint.”

Description of necklace:  Two strands of creamy-white, irregular, baroque imitation pearls with connecting pearls in a ladder shape creating a collar, each pearl separated by a white seed pearl.  The necklace strands at the clasp end have two rows of small, smooth, white pearls joining at a single pearl separated by a rhinestone rondelle and then attached to a jump ring and the Haskell slide clasp.  The central motif is attached to the necklace by more small white seed pearls at the center of the necklace strands.
The central motif consists of gilt metal leaves and flowers covered with 2mm white imitation pearls and rose montees.  The center...


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Pink glass looped bead collar with box clasp, spring-wire bracelet and button earrings, by Larry Vrba early 1970s. Signed Haskell.

Haskell did not combine a collar style with a dangling motif.  

The design of the fake does not follow the style or structure of a Haskell piece, but instead looks like two disparate entities that were joined together.


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Another example of a Haskell collar.  Notice the substantial clasp used to support the weight of this necklace as well as the pink collar in the prior picture.

Then note, the small Haskell slide clasp used in the fake necklace, both in pictures 1 and 4.  This clasp was not used by Haskell until 1975, contrary to the auction description ("1960s").


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Haskell slide clasp used on the fake to provide "provenance."

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Back of fake (with drop) surrounded by correct Haskell pieces.  Note sloppy wiring in fake.

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Haskell pearls as compared to fake pearls (on far right of photo).

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